Viagra Pills

Since Viagra has been introduced in 1998, Viagra pills have been the most widely used sexual enhancement drug in the United States. The drug has been used by men ranging from those with chronic erectile dysfunction to those with a general decrease in their sex drive.

Initially, Viagra pills had been designed and marketed with only male consumers in mind, but the popularity of the drug grew so quickly that women soon began asking for their own version of the little blue pill, the little pink pill. Pfizer, seeing the enormous potentials of an untapped market, announced their research into a new Viagra product catered towards women affected by sexual dysfunction.

Sadly, on February 24, 2004, the company announced that it was giving up on the research after eight years of work. Viagra pills had failed to produce sexual desire in women as it did in men. The reason, Pfizer researchers found, was that women and men possess different biological mechanisms involving arousal and desire. When a man gets an erection from the Viagra pill, he naturally desires sex. This has not been the case with women. Arousal and desire seem to be separated in the female. While Pfizer researchers found ways of creating outward signs of physical arousal in women, the desire was ultimately absent.

While arousal cannot create desire, the reverse cannot be said to be true. Desire in women almost always leads to physical arousal just as it does in men. The trick here then is to target women’s brains, for that is the true source of their sexual appetite. The research, led mostly by cardiologists and urologists, has been criticized for neglecting the psychological aspect of women’s sexuality. Convinced, eight years ago, that simple Viagra pills alone were enough to end sexual dysfunction for women, Pfizer has since been forced to come to terms with the much more complicated nature of the female libido.

© 2006 - 2013